Packers/Titans post game thread part 2

GBP4EVER

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I am not sold Kumerow makes it. I think Gute is in mold of TT were he values his draft picks more than a UDFA give me a couple more weeks after week 3 pre-season is when we know pretty much 40-45 guys who are likely locked in.
 
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Cheesedog

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I am not sold Kumerow makes it. I think Gute is in mold of TT were he values his draft picks more than a UDFA give me a couple more weeks after week 3 pre-season is when we know pretty much 40-45 guys who are likely locked in.
This is MM most of the team is already locked in. He doesn't look for the guys who step up he looks for reasons to keep his favorites. There are probably only a handful of spots still up for grabs. Like 5/6 WR. We just don't know what he's decided on yet ..... These next two preseason games don't matter in terms of his roster.
 

GBkrzygrl

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If any QB should be nervous it should be Hundley and rightly so. An article I read said that Hundley has a slight edge over Kizer, but I disagree. It appeared to me that Hundley played it safe despite some of the plays he made. I don't know. Maybe I've lost my objectivity, but Kizer seem to have the most upside between the 2. I think Hundley has gone as far as he can.

I'd love to see Kumerow make it. I think he and all of the rookies...except for this game, has shown some positive in camp so far. What I will be looking for in the next game is the consistency.
 

Nerd

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Hundley is still thinking too much. Mike McCarthy teaches QB'ing out of a textbook. He doesn't teach the feel of the game or what it FEELS like to play the position. So Hundley is playing just the way Mike teaches him. That's why he's always throwing behind guys.

Kizer needs to get the footwork down and the fundamentals for Mike's system. It's all based on the number of steps in the dropback, then getting the ball out. It puts your feet and your throw in position, based upon the play call. Kizer needs some time in the system for all that to click. It took Aaron three years.
 

Packinatl

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Hundley is still thinking too much. Mike McCarthy teaches QB'ing out of a textbook. He doesn't teach the feel of the game or what it FEELS like to play the position. So Hundley is playing just the way Mike teaches him. That's why he's always throwing behind guys.

Kizer needs to get the footwork down and the fundamentals for Mike's system. It's all based on the number of steps in the dropback, then getting the ball out. It puts your feet and your throw in position, based upon the play call. Kizer needs some time in the system for all that to click. It took Aaron three years.
If you watched Hundley at UCLA he is playing the way he always has. Inability to read progressions, locks on to a receiver, run first mentally when option #1 is not available, questionable accuracy deep. Kizer is much the same. Had accuracy issues at ND, reading progressions. Kizer has more upside but is either a guy who can start and win? Kizer maybe. Hundley no. As a competent back up. Kizer yes. Hundley no
 

ChampionshipBelt

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This is the reason I would keep Kiser and Boyle. Kiser can be back up for this year then let Boyle and him duke it out next year. If Boyle improves like he could next year then Kiser can be cut and Boyle can take over. That is if Boyle is what I think he can be.
 

TW

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Every time I think about who should be our back up QB, I think about last year, and how the Packers did not have a competent back up when Rodgers was injured. If you're going to keep a guy as the back up he should either be capable of winning games, or have the potential to become a solid QB through coaching and playing time. In either case, this bodes well for the team today, and tomorrow.

Last year, with Hundley, the Packers had neither. They had a guy who certainly wasn't capable of winning now, and offered little to no upside for the future. The real option was probably Taysom Hill.

Why Hill? Totally inexperienced. What's the difference? Putting someone like Hundley on the field, you know you're going to get beat. He's predictable, and quite honestly, not talented enough to show improvement that would make me believe he can be a real field leader. On the other hand, despite his inexperience, Taysom Hill showed at least a flicker of leadership capability, and the raw talent needed to develop at least into a reasonably decent substitute, on a long term basis.

For the Packers to even think they have such a good team, and every other facet of the game so well covered that no matter who is at QB, they'll still win is ridiculous. They are a team that wins solely on the ability of Rodgers to generate enough offense to put points on the board that is higher than that of the opponent. Without him, our production is cut in half, and we're going to lose most of the time.

It makes sense that any back up they have today should be a player with a "hopeful future," not someone who will make you feel doomed the moment he takes the field.

To me, based on what I see so far in camp, I'd keep Rodgers, Kizer, and Boyle on the roster, and quit angling to go with two guys. Who knows? Maybe Boyle has that raw talent to become a #1, and end up being a viable replacement for Rodgers down the road. You just don't know until you give the guy a chance.
 

57packer

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Hundley is still thinking too much. Mike McCarthy teaches QB'ing out of a textbook. He doesn't teach the feel of the game or what it FEELS like to play the position. So Hundley is playing just the way Mike teaches him. That's why he's always throwing behind guys.

Kizer needs to get the footwork down and the fundamentals for Mike's system. It's all based on the number of steps in the dropback, then getting the ball out. It puts your feet and your throw in position, based upon the play call. Kizer needs some time in the system for all that to click. It took Aaron three years.
Not going to strongly dispute what you are saying because I don't know for sure what Hundley's problems are exactly. The thing for me is that maybe this is just who Hundley is. Doesn't have the strongest, most accurate arm so he over-thinks every throw.

Look at Boyle. Been with the team for a few months, not a few years, and seemed to spend much less time thinking. Drop back, see the window, and make the throw. Was he always accurate - hardly, but he seemed more decisive, especially on those out routes. Maybe he has a strong arm so just didn't worry about that throw or over-think it. He just saw the opening and gunned it in there.

MM may certainly be part of the problem, but I suspect some the problem is just Hundley.
 

TW

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Look at Boyle. Been with the team for a few months, not a few years, and seemed to spend much less time thinking. Drop back, see the window, and make the throw. Was he always accurate - hardly, but he seemed more decisive, especially on those out routes. Maybe he has a strong arm so just didn't worry about that throw or over-think it. He just saw the opening and gunned it in there.

MM may certainly be part of the problem, but I suspect some the problem is just Hundley.
This is the point which separates the QBs who make it in the NFL, and those that don't. You rarely get the opportunity to throw to a guy who is open. You get to throw to a guy who can and will get open because you trust his skills, and are confident in what he's doing. You're actually fast forwarding yourself to a point where things will be, long after you actually throw the ball. Then there's that little thing in the back of your head that tells you that you've made the right choice, and let it fly. When that happens, and the player catches that ball, everyone thinks it was so simple because he was open. But, he wasn't, when you let it rip.

When you arrive at that junction, the game has slowed down in front of you, and you understand the whole thing like you never have before. Hundley does not have that capability. It shows in his hesitance to throw to someone unless they are open. Kizer shows a little of those skills, but sometimes hesitates, not trusting the receivers. Boyle has already reached the point where he's beginning to understand that relationship to the guys he's throwing to. Sometimes he hesitates, but usually he doesn't. He cuts it loose. A good example is the back shoulder throw he made to a guy who he'd seen was pinched to the sideline. You can teach it, but you need to understand it, and trust the receiver understands exactly what you intend to do. They did it together. Then there's the touch pass, over the top. The one where you see your man closely covered, but you throw it up, over the top, to a point you are confident he can reach, and it falls safely into his hands, not the defender's.

I liked what I saw in Boyle. He's not ready to step in and be our #1. Not even thinking that. But, in two or three years on the roster, as our back up, he just might be ready to step in somewhere and be a number one, and worth a ton to the Packers in trade value. Then there's also the fact that we don't know about Rodgers health down the road, and if he'll be there in three years. I at least think Boyle is a better option for "potential" than the other two.
 

Nerd

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Let's see what Kizer has in the next year or two. Remember, Aaron wasn't exactly lighting it up his first couple of preseasons.
 
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