Personal finance and investing mega thread extravaganza

FlaPack

Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
Messages
9,540
Reaction score
4,299
Yeah Austin seems a huge Yuppie area so they would want those apts and coffee shops and bars for them to hang out in that are old businesses like that.
Tech industry is really strong in Austin, fun town especially 6th Street
 
  • Like
Reactions: TW

TW

Moderator
Moderator
Messages
4,608
Reaction score
2,859
Tech industry is really strong in Austin, fun town especially 6th Street
6th Street has been the scene of a lot of crime, and shootings over the last year. Increased police presence hasn't helped too much.

The tech industry is booming. Because of it, everything else is as well. Williamson County has the highest, or one of the highest, GDP increases in the nation. Travis County is right behind. Both are showing amazing population growth.

You can now travel from Georgetown (North of Austin) all the way down to San Antonio, and essentially never leave city. That's 107 miles.
 

Mark87

Carpe Diem
Admin
Messages
7,745
Reaction score
5,556
Website
wisconsinsportstalk.net
The U.S. economy added 210,000 jobs in November, marking a slowdown in hiring amid new Covid-19 uncertainties, but a tight labor market showed an early sign of loosening as almost 600,000 people joined the workforce.

The slower pace of hiring last month—the smallest monthly gain since last December— followed an upwardly revised increase of 546,000 jobs in October, the Labor Department said. The unemployment rate fell to 4.2% as more people joined the labor force, the department added.


Economists had expected more than half a million new jobs in November. The unexpectedly low number could end up being revised higher later, said Aneta Markowska, chief economist at Jefferies LLC.
“The headline miss doesn’t really change what we thought about the labor market,” she said. “It’s still very healthy and it’s moving toward maximum employment very quickly.”

The low employment number, which comes from a Labor Department survey of businesses, contrasts with data from a separate survey of households, also released Friday, that showed strong progress in employment.
That survey showed that 1.1 million more people were employed in November than in October and a labor-force participation rate increase to 61.8%, the highest level since March 2020 at the start of the pandemic.

That could be due to higher wages drawing people back into the workforce, economists said. Employers have complained of a shortage of labor and have been raising salaries and offering new benefits to entice prospective new employees.
Average hourly wages were up 4.8% in November from the previous year, roughly on par with October, but well above annual growth rates before the pandemic which hovered around 3%.

The bigger workforce could also be due to more people taking up gig work or starting their own businesses, trends which wouldn’t show up on the employer survey, Ms. Markowska said. Overall, she said, the household survey results point to an improving labor market.
The economy over the past couple of months appeared to have been rebounding from a summertime slowdown caused by the Covid-19 Delta variant and supply-chain disruptions. Household spending picked up 1.3% in October from the previous month, outpacing inflation, as a strengthening labor market and accumulated household savings prompted consumers to splurge.
The retail sector lost 20,000 jobs in November, with losses concentrated in general merchandise, clothing and sporting goods stores that were partly offset by increases in food and beverage stores and building supply stores.
Transportation and warehousing added 50,000 positions and professional and business services added 90,000.
 

GBP4EVER

Draft Guru
2021 Draft Guru
Messages
10,060
Reaction score
2,163
Started investing in Crypto. Had $6 from a dividend in my brokage account so decided to buy .0001 shares of Bitcoin. TO THE MOON! LOL
 

Mark87

Carpe Diem
Admin
Messages
7,745
Reaction score
5,556
Website
wisconsinsportstalk.net
Prices that suppliers are charging businesses and other customers leapt in November, signaling that broad-based price pressures are still building throughout the U.S. supply chain.

The Labor Department said Tuesday that its producer-price index rose 9.6% in November from a year earlier, the most since records began in 2010. The so-called core PPI, which excludes often volatile food and energy components, climbed 7.7% from a year ago, also the highest on record.

The higher-than-expected producer-price numbers suggest that consumer inflation, which hit a nearly four-decade high of 6.8% last month, will stay elevated into 2022 as price pressures persist.
The index, which generally reflects supply conditions in the economy, rose 0.8% from October, an acceleration from the 0.6% gain in each of the previous three months. Higher prices for energy, wholesale food, and transportation and warehousing contributed to the pickup in inflation.
Persistently high prices in large part reflected clogged supply chains, as manufacturers scrambled to keep up with unusually strong consumer demand. The rise in prices of goods continued to outpace that for services, as consumer spending on goods remains elevated, while that on services is up just slightly from pre-pandemic levels.

Prices for goods, excluding food and energy, climbed 0.8% in November from October, faster than the 0.6% increase the previous month. The services index advanced 0.7% on the month, up from 0.2% in October, driven in part by a pickup in hotel room rates and airfares.

The easing of inflation for goods used to make other products, though still high, signaled that producer-price inflation is nearing its peak, said Gus Faucher, chief economist at PNC. “PPI inflation will slow in 2022 as prices for energy and other raw materials decline thanks to greater production, weaker demand, and a gradual waning in supply chain problems,” said Mr. Faucher. “But PPI inflation will remain above its long-run levels due to continued strong demand for some goods and services and higher wages.”
Persistently high prices in large part reflected clogged supply chains, as manufacturers scrambled to keep up with unusually strong consumer demand. The rise in prices of goods continued to outpace that for services, as consumer spending on goods remains elevated, while that on services is up just slightly from pre-pandemic levels.

Along with last week’s consumer inflation data, today’s producer data add to the case for Fed officials to speed up plans for winding down their stimulus efforts as the Federal Open Market Committee meets today and tomorrow. A faster taper would pave the way to raise interest rates in the spring to curb inflation. “The [Federal Reserve] should be very concerned,” said Mr. Stanley.
 

FlaPack

Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
Messages
9,540
Reaction score
4,299
Said it before, my fear is they missed the window to taper. Yes I think a rate hike is baked into the street but how much who knows
 

FlaPack

Lifetime Member
Lifetime Member
Messages
9,540
Reaction score
4,299
It's past time and the correction will be much bigger than they think, which will affect elsewhere such as the housing market.
I agree the market need a correction maybe 5% but that’s more about an overbought market. Depends how many basis points the Fed hikes up re: housing. Its not a sub prime market thank the lord. Will probably slow down the market but that might be a good thing based on current supply/ demand.
 
Top