Packers Offense 2019 Season

Mark87

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A lot of chatter here and everywhere about the what GB should do about offense should MM leave.... and yes that's stil a big IF but thats for another post. Now several here think/want/believe in going the McVay type route or Lincoln Riley route based on spread concepts. I get it but disagre. May I present again the Erhardt–Perkins system :

The Erhardt–Perkins system is based on loose "concepts" that adapt to a variety of personnel packages and formations. Given a set of eleven players on offense and their initial formation, the quarterback gives the code name for a play concept that is to be run. Players do not simply learn to receive and execute their assignments; they learn the entire playbook and know what every player does on every play. A player can be lined up in a formation other than his usual one to exploit a mismatch with the defense. (For example, a strong and large tight end can be lined up against a smaller cornerback, or a speedy wide receiver matched with a slower linebacker.) The player must know what his task is in his new position. Every player aims to be interchangeable with every other player, as no player is tied to any one specific route or assignment on any play.

A typical Erhardt–Perkins concept assigns each player a task based on his initial location. For example, "Ghost" is a three-receiver concept: the outside receiver runs a vertical or fly route, the middle receiver runs an 8-yard out route, and the inside receiver runs a flat route. "Ghost" works in any personnel package or formation; it can be run with a five wide receiver set in a spread formation, or "base personnel" in the I formation where the fullback motions into the slot position.

The Erhardt–Perkins system is more flexible than the other systems. The play call is simple and brief. The team can use the remaining time on the play clock not to assign instructions but to study the defense and adapt its plan. The Erhardt–Perkins system works well with the no-huddle offense. The offense can run at a faster pace, getting more offensive plays in per game, conserving the time on the game clock, and keeping the defense on its heels.

The Erhardt–Perkins system was developed by Ron Erhardt and Ray Perkins, two assistant coaches who worked under Chuck Fairbanks for the Patriots during the 1970s. The system was later implemented by the New York Giants in 1982 when Perkins was hired as their head coach, and Erhardt as his offensive coordinator. A third coach who followed Perkins and Erhardt from the Patriots to the Giants was defensive assistant Bill Parcells, who succeeded Perkins as head coach. Being primarily a defensive coach, Parcells retained Erhardt as his offensive coordinator and let him continue to use the Erhardt–Perkins offense and its play calling system. The system was disseminated through the league by various members of the Parcells coaching tree, and is used effectively by Patriots head coach Bill Belichick.

Part 2 :

For many years, the Erhardt-Perkins offense was known as the original ground-and-pound, a conservative, run-first offense summed up by Erhardt’s mantra, “You throw to score and run to win.”
With the help of his assistants, Belichick’s primary innovation was to go from an Erhardt-Perkins offense to an Erhardt-Perkins system, built on its method of organizing and naming plays. The offense itself would be philosophically neutral. This is how, using the terminology and framework of what was once thought to be the league’s least progressive offensive system, Brady and Belichick built one of the most consistently dynamic and explosive offenses in NFL history. From conservative to spread to blistering no-huddle, the tactics — and players — have changed while the underlying approach has not.2
Let’s look at a play that has long been a staple of the Patriots attack. This is actually two different concepts put together — “ghost/tosser,” which has the Patriots run the ghost concept to one side and the tosser concept to the other. Ghost has the outermost receiver, whoever it is, run a vertical route, one inside receiver run to a depth of roughly eight yards before breaking flat to the outside, and the innermost receiver run immediately to the flat. It’s a form of the “stick” or “turn” concept that essentially every NFL team uses. On the other side, tosser means that the receivers run the double-slant concept. The page below is from the Patriots’ playbook.



The theory here is that no matter the formation, there is an outside receiver, an inside receiver, and a middle receiver, and each will be responsible for running his designated route. For the quarterback, this means the play can be run repeatedly, from different formations and with different personnel, all while his read stays effectively the same. Once receivers understand each concept, they only have to know at which position they’re lined up. The personnel and formation might cause the defense to respond differently, but for New England those changes only affect which side Brady prefers or which receiver he expects to be open. This conceptual approach is how the Patriots are able to run the same basic plays, whether spreading the field with four or five receivers or using multiple tight ends and running backs.





The most recent innovation to fall into New England’s Erhardt-Perkins framework is a commitment to the no-huddle. In 2012, the Patriots were the league leaders in total plays, first downs, points, and yards — all by a significant margin. Other teams have dabbled in the no-huddle, but they can’t commit to it like the Patriots can, for one simple reason: terminology. No team that uses the Coryell or true West Coast systems can adapt easily to a fully functional up-tempo no-huddle because, simply, they can’t communicate that efficiently. The Patriots are built to communicate in one- or two-word designations, and so, with judicious use of code words, it’s simply a matter of translating what they already do into a no-huddle pace.

This marriage of terminology and technique, of efficiency and elegance, is what makes the Patriots so mesmerizing. Like NFL offenses, in recent years NFL defenses have also become too wordy, relying on long-winded calls designating scheme and technique and impractical checks. With the speed at which New England operates, the message for defenses has become clear: fix your terminology or perish. For opposing offenses, the mandate is less direct but just as imperative. The Patriots have set the standard for modern offense, and if teams are going to keep up, they’ll need to change not how they play, but how they talk.


So with that GB should seek out a OC to bring in to install and run the Erhardt–Perkins, it works and it wins. sb(tc(

Go ahead and argue or counter a better concept. I am game
 

Cheesedog

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Good stuff. This flexibility also plays into Arods intellect and ability to read defenses.

No more wasting the whole okay clock waiting for MM to finally get the play in.
 

dannobanano

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Doesn’t Sean Payton run a version of this offense in New Orleans? He coached under Parcells didn’t he?

If I’m right, then hiring an offensive coach from the Saints could be in play, ooooooor, hire Saints OC Pete Carmichael as your next HC?
sneaky:
 

Mark87

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Doesn’t Sean Payton run a version of this offense in New Orleans? He coached under Parcells didn’t he?

If I’m right, then hiring an offensive coach from the Saints could be in play, ooooooor, hire Saints OC Pete Carmichael as your next HC?
sneaky:
No he runs the Coryell system with West coast concepts mixed in.
 

Backthepack4ever

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Good stuff. This flexibility also plays into Arods intellect and ability to read defenses.

No more wasting the whole okay clock waiting for MM to finally get the play in.
I know this is off topic but worth saying. Gary Ellerson claims he talked with Trevor Davis and its AR in the huddle telling guys what to run instead of going with a scripted play. now idk if this is 100% true but if it is this is a qb problem on the field and a coach that has lost complete control.

back on topic. Im all for this. It makes a lot of sense and would constantly keep the d at a disadvantage. Prob why the pats continue to win with less then stellar rosters. It does require players to learn a lot and have some tools between the ears. prob why teams don't run it ha.

Whatever system we go to.... we can agree Mac should go, the HC needs to reel in our qb and not let him play school yard football. deep balls are sexy, but dinking and dunking a team to death kills them
 

Terranimal

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I know this is off topic but worth saying. Gary Ellerson claims he talked with Trevor Davis and its AR in the huddle telling guys what to run instead of going with a scripted play. now idk if this is 100% true but if it is this is a qb problem on the field and a coach that has lost complete control.

back on topic. Im all for this. It makes a lot of sense and would constantly keep the d at a disadvantage. Prob why the pats continue to win with less then stellar rosters. It does require players to learn a lot and have some tools between the ears. prob why teams don't run it ha.

Whatever system we go to.... we can agree Mac should go, the HC needs to reel in our qb and not let him play school yard football. deep balls are sexy, but dinking and dunking a team to death kills them
Favre did the same thing when MM took over and used to upset MM.

Even though AR might change the plays It's still from the system and limited by what personnel is on the field.

Dink and dunk was part of the WCO. Short passes were like a run especially if lacking a quality running game. But still had to go vertical to keep defenses honest. Also was dependent on great route runners and yards after the catch like Rice and Sharpe did
 

Backthepack4ever

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Favre did the same thing when MM took over and used to upset MM.

Even though AR might change the plays It's still from the system and limited by what personnel is on the field.

Dink and dunk was part of the WCO. Short passes were like a run especially if lacking a quality running game. But still had to go vertical to keep defenses honest. Also was dependent on great route runners and yards after the catch like Rice and Sharpe did
I disagree with the personal thing. if AR is telling these guys to run things that the play call wasn't calling for its more going against mac then the guys on the field. It would also be why we are not getting out of the huddle and burning timeouts. if hes changing stuff at the time based on what he sees that's fine but in the huddle going rouge is another. again I don't know how true this is but there is something stinky here. Im sick of trying to go deep so much when there are guys open underneath. AR missed a ton of open guys on Thursday. that's more on him and not the other personnel. MM is at fault to have this stuff go on. He cant control this group and it shows.

Yep the WCO thrived on short passes and good routes but the system mark is talking about does the same. Brady lives on the quick hits and short stuff. get the ball out and let the guys make plays. ill take 5 yards every play all day
 

Terranimal

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Great explanation of the system Mark. Shorter terminology is badly needed. Some teams have such long cadences it burns half the clock and running no huddle almost impossible.

Regardless of what offensive or defensive system is used still need to have the correct personnel to execute. Something TT failed to do in later years compounded by MM and his staff failed to develop players. Proof is by players littered by players cut here playing or have played on other teams as back ups or starters
 
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