Learning family history

TW

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I've been fortunate to have been born into a family that never stood still, and waited for things to happen. Pretty much every generation has been part of something unique, and part of history. I just found out something new about an uncle's wife's brother, who was a member of the ground crew for the Enola Gay. It's something that he never said much about to anyone. I guess the enormity of it was beyond belief.

He became a religious man who attended Mass as regularly as possible. I guess he was constantly looking for answers in regards to what they did. I'm a believer in his approach to the whole thing. Notariety isn't for some of us. I think he chose wisely. He was a humble person.
 

oakleaf

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...the enormity of it was beyond belief.
"The enormity of it was beyond belief." Few truer words exist TW. I understand your aunt's brother's remorse and penitence.

Can you imagine being Truman and carrying the burden of making this decision? He had four options: 1) continue conventional saturation bombing of Japanese cities; 2) invade Japan; 3) demonstrate the bomb; or, 4) drop the bomb on a Japanese city. However, saturation bombing already resulted in 350,000 Japanese deaths and almost half a million wounded; invading Japan would have been very costly to U.S. forces considering how the Japanese fought; and they only had two working bombs at the time and were afraid a demo would be ineffective. So Truman ordered the American B-29 bomber Enola Gay to drop the atomic bomb Little Boy over Hiroshima on 8/6/45. The world's first atomic bomb to be used for it's purpose killed 80,000 people directly, injured 35,000, and over 60,000 more were dead within a year due to the effects of radiation. The deaths were gruesome. Japan still didn't surrender and one week later the Nagasaki bomb was dropped.

Truman regretted having to do it, but never apologized, saying as the President, "And he alone, in all the world, must say Yes or No to that awesome, ultimate question, 'Shall we drop the bomb on a living target?'"
 

TW

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Truman regretted having to do it, but never apologized, saying as the President, "And he alone, in all the world, must say Yes or No to that awesome, ultimate question, 'Shall we drop the bomb on a living target?'"
I never experienced anything the magnitude of what he did - thankfully.
 
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