Bill Curry Message is A Must watch

realitybytes

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i'm not really sure i agree with his specific claim of the "importance of football", but i firmly believe that when we alter our daily lives as a knee-jerk reaction to terrorism, we give the terrorists exactly what they want. i think it is important to live our lives as "normally" as possible and not give the terrorists power over us. if that means playing a football game just as we had planned to do, then yes - it is important to play that game of football.
 

HeartyHops

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i'm not really sure i agree with his specific claim of the "importance of football", but i firmly believe that when we alter our daily lives as a knee-jerk reaction to terrorism, we give the terrorists exactly what they want.
I agree. Football is not very important in the grand scheme of things, but we should just carry on.

Now, I have to admit that I will probably never again attend a 'huge event' in a 'big venue'. Does that mean the terrorists win? No. It just means that I'm rather old, and can't be bothered.. :)
 

rpiotr01

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The point isn't about football, per se. It's about having something that binds a community together, binds a people together, something that creates and sustains a culture. Many parts of the county have chosen football to do that but it doesn't necessarily have to be. If we don't have that, then what makes us, us? What unites us? What this guy is speaking to right now is IMO the big issue of our time, and that is that the collective identity of our country is changing, and not just morphing into something new but flat out fracturing along tectonic lines. The thing that unites one group of people is seen by another group not only as something that doesn't unite them, but something that is flat out wrong, or a symbol of misogyny/racism/etc. How do you unite those two sides? How can you even call them the same people?
 

TW

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The point isn't about football, per se. It's about having something that binds a community together, binds a people together, something that creates and sustains a culture. Many parts of the county have chosen football to do that but it doesn't necessarily have to be. If we don't have that, then what makes us, us? What unites us? What this guy is speaking to right now is IMO the big issue of our time, and that is that the collective identity of our country is changing, and not just morphing into something new but flat out fracturing along tectonic lines. The thing that unites one group of people is seen by another group not only as something that doesn't unite them, but something that is flat out wrong, or a symbol of misogyny/racism/etc. How do you unite those two sides? How can you even call them the same people?
Well stated. We need to find commonality, but it doesn't have to be on a football field, it can be anywhere, as long as it's a common cause. The people of Texas, in the Houston area, found that commonality in purpose as they help each other rise from the effects of a hurricane that made all the differences we seem to think important trivial by comparison.

In all honesty, I don't believe football is the menu for successfully broaching the gaps between people. I think it's tragedies, where people find they have more in common than they had thought earlier. It's in tragedy that we learn empathy, and the macho image of football is far from people's minds.

J.J. Watt's raising of millions of dollars for the victims of the hurricane was because of his popularity, and the respect people have for him in the Houston area. We have to credit football for giving him that popularity, but not the respect, because he earned that by who he was, and is, in the Houston area. He brought people together because of the tragedy, and his appeal was received well by everyone, because they knew he had no ulterior motives.

I don't think you can break down walls between people. I think they have to do that through things that force them together, where they see each other differently than they had, in the past. I found my way past these differences in the military. When your life depends on each other, and believe me, in the job I did in Vietnam, our lives were hanging by a thread with each other, and we had to trust each other, or die. That was our tragedy - life or death.

The time is coming when everyone is going to have to stand by the edge of that gap, and decide where they go from there. I hope they make the right decision.
 
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