Hard Times Come to Much of Rural America

Discussion in 'Curley's Pub' started by Mark87, Jun 4, 2017.

  1. Mark87

    Mark87 Carpe Diem Admin

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    THIS is where you and I agree 100 %.... both these parties have no interest in you and me.
     
  2. realitybytes

    realitybytes Member

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    wait. you agree 100% but you gave me a dislike? lol.
     
  3. Mark87

    Mark87 Carpe Diem Admin

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    wrong thumb LOL
     
  4. TW

    TW Moderator

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    An interesting fact. The US supplies over 95% of all the corn they use in Mexico. The government subsidizes the corn prices, to keep them high enough to make it a viable crop. With the Trump anti-NAFTA rhetoric, the Mexican government is looking at two suppliers from South America, who they intend to use, replacing the US. It's probably going to happen, even if we don't change NAFTA, because of the threats made by Trump.

    If you're looking for a reason "why" rural America is overlooked, it's because of the indifference of people in Congress, because rural America, it starts here.

    As for corporate farms not being a problem, they certainly are. It starts with the labor force. Most corporate farming groups hire lowest wage immigrants, and often illegals, thereby leaving hundreds of thousands of Americans unemployed. But, coupled with that is the fact that a large number of the Americans who are unemployed won't accept the low wages, and hard labor, associated with the job. Every time a family farm goes under, members of the family lose their jobs, and they aren't being replaced by jobs that they can make a living, doing.

    Small farmers, and rural America, voting for Trump, may end up being the dumbest thing they could have possibly done. He has absolutely no interest in these people, because they aren't wealthy, and can't buy into his "plans" with big investments. People are going to hurt even more than they have, with him in DC.
     
  5. realitybytes

    realitybytes Member

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    it has been proven time and time again that americans do not want those jobs. just read an article a few weeks ago about farms having loads of open positions that nobody is applying for. that whole "they're taking away our jobs" argument is a lie.
     
  6. TW

    TW Moderator

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    From January, through March, there are job fairs in south Texas that hire thousands of workers for farms, and other agricultural operations in the north. They can't hire enough, because of the restrictions as to number of green cards issued for that purpose.

    One person, involved in northern corporate farming, told me that this is creating a problem for them, because they're forced to hire illegals to complete their work force. Making matters worse, the permanent, better paying jobs, with full benefits, go unfilled, because they can't even find local people willing to work hard enough to fill these positions. Hence, the migration to metro areas, and jobs in manufacturing and business. Rural population goes down further.

    There are meat packing plants in Wisconsin and Minnesota, where nearly all employees are Hispanic, and an unknown percentage are actually illegal, because they can't find anyone else who will take these jobs.

    We don't need a wall between the US and Mexico. We need a better green card program that provides opportunities for those from south of our border who are willing to work, and fill those jobs, that the average American finds beneath their dignity.

    I'm not saying let them flood into this country, but I am saying that they aren't take jobs the average person wants, and quite honestly, having them pay taxes and be more controlled in entry makes more sense than rounding people up like cattle and throwing them out.

    You need look no further than the Alabama immigration laws that destroyed farms in one short year. It's proof that tighter restrictions aren't the answer, larger and controlled entry are what it should really be all about. Instead of making it difficult, the Fed should hook up with employers to help them fill their needs, legally. A system where the government issues green cards to "fill jobs," not on a low ball quota basis. These people could be vetted, and given green cards after vetting, and job offers. If you do that, you could, in fact, make it a felony to hire illegals. Until then, this who border situation is totally unworkable. You're not going to stop people from crossing the border for a chance at a better life. We're destroying farming because of our biases. It has to stop.

    Alabama crops rot in fields
     
  7. 57packer

    57packer 2017 Draft Guru

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    The rhetoric around illegals is such a mix of fact and fiction that for most Americans it's tough to know what the truth is. I won't pretend that I do. The reality to me seems like we do need to have some control of who is here. Are they paying taxes as they should. Are their employers paying taxes as they should. Are their lives risked because owners of businesses don't care, because they are undocumented.

    At the same time, the basic truth is that while they may take some jobs that youth and starting workers might take, the real truth is that they are taking jobs the the vast majority of Americans and most youth and starting workers don't want and won't take. When I was young I took a dirty, hot, physically tiring job each summer because it paid pretty well. All of my friends took jobs that paid less but were easier and more comfortable. I would gladly have taken farm work, but didn't live near a farm - I got the chance on occasion when I visited grandpa's farm. I was the small minority.

    You don't see a ton of Hispanic workers in those more "comfortable" jobs. They tend to work on farms, landscaping crews, roofing crews, etc. I think that happens for 2 reasons - availability of jobs and the fact that many of those jobs do not require strong English skills. Sadly, I think there is some truth to the idea that if you sent all the illegals back to where they came from, you'd have trouble getting milk and produce to market, lawns cut and landscaped, roofs covered . . .
     

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